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MySQL - MariaDB sidegrade

More and more MySQL users want to switch from MySQL/Percona Server to MariaDB over time or, more rarely, the other way around. This is mostly caused by the change of the default in the Linux Distributions (RHEL/CentOS 7, SLES 12, Debian 8) to MariaDB.
Up to MySQL/MariaDB 5.5 everything was quite easy, both Branches claim to be a drop-in replacement of each other. But after the separation into different forks (MariaDB 10.0 ff. vs. MySQL 5.6 ff.) we expect more and more problems migrating from one branch to the other what we call sidegrade.

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What are the differences between MySQL Community and MySQL Enterprise Server 5.7

The MySQL Server itself

The differences between the MySQL Community Server and the MySQL Enterprise Server 5.7 are as follows as claimed by Oracle:

Differences between MySQL and MariaDB

  • max_user_connections Can be changed online in MySQL. Cannot be changed in MariaDB if value was set to 0.
  • PERFORMANCE_SCHEMA is enabled in MySQL 5.6 and 5.7 by default. In MariaDB disabled by default.
  • Replication incompatibilities from MariaDB (Master) to MySQL (Slave)
  • MariaDB 10.2.0 still contains XtraDB 5.6. So MySQL 5.7 features cannot be used.
  • MariaDB 10.2 Window Functions are missing in MySQL 5.7
  • SHOW PROCESSLIST has additional column Progress in MariaDB.
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Migration between MySQL/Percona Server and MariaDB

This week, we did some migrations from MariaDB 10.0 to Percona Server 5.6 at the IT department of a big German bank.

We were perfectly aware that since version 10.0 the MariaDB code base started to diverge slightly away from the MySQL and Percona Server code base which are still pretty close to each other.

Because of the Percona Server option enforce_storage_engine we wanted to do this migration.

MySQL single query performance - the truth!

MySQL single query performance - the truth!

As suggested by morgo I did a little test for the same query and the same data-set mentioned in Impact of column types on MySQL JOIN performance but looking into an other dimension: the time (aka MySQL versions).

The answer

To make it short. As a good consultant the answer must be: "It depends!" :-)

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